Birch Trees and Babbling Brooks
sublim-ature:

Mt. Rainier, WashingtonSean Bagshaw

sublim-ature:

Mt. Rainier, Washington
Sean Bagshaw

msexplorer:

Let’s do it, my-sea-of-time and ms-witchywebweaver!  Thursday morning dancing - living in the moment and just being!  Lots of love and hugs to you both!  Have an amazing day!  Sending good and peaceful vibes your way!!  xoxo

msexplorer:

Let’s do it, my-sea-of-time and ms-witchywebweaver!  Thursday morning dancing - living in the moment and just being!  Lots of love and hugs to you both!  Have an amazing day!  Sending good and peaceful vibes your way!!  xoxo

Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show - The Cover of The Rolling Stone
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classic-tunes:

The Cover of The Rolling Stone - Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show

polynotes:

What’s Up With Nonmonogamy (all pages)

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gunrunnerhell:

“Discipline and concentration are a matter of being interested." - Tom Kite

gunrunnerhell:

Discipline and concentration are a matter of being interested." - Tom Kite

madchenfurwolf:

The Man in the Crowd.

Hitler seen in August 1914 in the assembled crowd at the Odeonplatz as cheers erupt in favor of going to War.

Later in the Winter of 1919 / 1920, Hitler is seen again in a Munich crowd, this time listening to a speaker from a rooftop in Lenbachplatz calling for freedom from the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. The first 26 clauses of the treaty dealt with creating Woodrow Wilson’s League of Nations, and the remaining 414 dealt with punishment of Germany.

peashooter85:

Crossin’ da T  with Horatio Nelson,

In September of 1805, Europe was under the control of Napoleon Bonaparte and heavily blockaded by the British Royal Navy.  With Britain’s mastery of the sea, it was hope that the French could be starved into economic submission.  However Napoleon controlled both the French and Spanish fleets.  In that month, he ordered ships from both fleets to combine into one large armada, which he intended to use to break the blockade, allowing for troops to be moved in and out of Spain.

Seeing the buildup of French and Spanish ships, Admiral Horatio Nelson gathered as many ships as he could to counter the French threat.  The combined Franco Spanish fleet consisted of 41 warships, Nelson’s fleet only consisted of 33.  Worse yet, the ships of the Franco Spanish fleet were the largest in Napoleon’s navy.  Many of the ships comprising of Nelson’s fleet were outclassed.  While it is often unwise to attack when outnumbered and outgunned, Nelson had a bold plan to gain the edge over the French.

In traditional naval warfare of the age, ships form a battle line and fought broadside to broadside with the enemy.  Nelson utilized a new tactic called “crossing the T”.  While Nelson was not the first naval tactician to “cross the T”, he is certainly credited as being the master T crosser who revolutionized 19th century naval warfare.  When crossing the T, rather than engaging the broadside to broadside, a fleet forms a battle line but crosses through the enemy fleet in a perpendicular fashion.  The advantage of this is that the enemy cannot bring his broadside guns to bear against the attacking fleet, while at the same the attacking fleet can bring all of their broadside guns against the defenders.

On October 21st, 1805 Nelson order an all out assault on the Franco Spansh fleet off the coast of Trafalgar. It was then that the Franco Spanish fleet set sail from port, sailing north in a battle line. Nelson approached the fleet with two perpendicular battle lines, thus crossing the T of the Franco Spanish fleet at two points.  This divided the Franco Spanish fleet into three sections.  The first third of the fleet ended up being cut off from the rest, being unable to turn around due to prevailing winds and currents.  This part of the fleet continued sailing north, and would play no further part in the battle.  The middle section of the fleet ended up being sandwiched between Nelson’s two battle lines.  Forced between a rock and a hard place, the middle section had no choice but to surrender or be blown to pieces.  Finally, the final third of the fleet had no choice but to sail north into the maelstrom, again due to prevailing winds and currents.  It too faced a heavy pounding until it could either escape of surrender.

The Battle of Trafalgar was a resounding victory for Nelson and the British Navy.  During the battle, the Franco Spanish fleet had lost 22 of its 41 ships.  The Royal Navy lost no ships, however Nelson himself was mortally wounded during the fighting.  The Battle of Trafalgar was Britain’s resounding victory during the Napoleonic Wars, securing British naval dominance over the world for decades to come.  As for Napoleon, the French and Spanish fleets would never pose a threat to Britain and her allies again.

historicalfirearms:

The Battle of Trafalgar 

209 years ago today a numerically inferior British fleet led by Admiral Horatio Nelson defeated a combined Spanish & French fleet, numbering 33 Ships of the Line, off the coast of southern Spain.

Nelson cut the battle line of the Franco-Spanish fleet with two columns and engaged the enemy piecemeal, while not the first time this tactic had been used it is the most famous.  Nelson’s victory ended the threat of a French invasion of England, with no fleet to escort them Napoleon’s Grand Armee a Boulogne could not cross the channel.  While numerically inferior the British fleet was made up of a better proportion of 1st and 2nd rate ships, ships of between 75 and 110 guns.  They were also in a high state of preparedness as years of blockading French and Spanish seaports meant they were far better sailors and gunners than their continental opponents, who had been shut up port by the British blockade.  

Nelson was famously mortally wounded at the height of the battle, shot through the spine by a French marksman in the tops of the French ship Redoubtable.  Arguably it is his death that elevated the victory in the minds of the British people to a point that even today most Britons know the story of Nelson at Trafalgar.  Today brass plaque marks the place he fell on the deck of HMS Victory.  

The battle was extremely bloody with the British suffering nearly 1,700 casualties with 22% of the fleet’s captains being casualties.  The French and Spanish loses were horrific losing 22 ships, nearly 3,300 killed and 8,000 captured including the French Admiral Villeneuve, who was released a year later and allegedly murdered on Napoleon’s orders. 

Image One Source

Image Two Source

Image Three Source

Oxford Companion to Military History, (ed.) R. Holmes, (2001)

historiandaily:

"We have lost more than we have gained." -King George III of Great Britain, upon hearing of Horatio Nelson’s death.
October 21, 1805- In the most decisive naval battle of the Napoleonic Wars, a combined fleet of 41 French and Spanish ships are defeated by 33 British ships under Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar. The battle crippled French maritime power for the remainder of the war and ensured Britain would be the sole naval power in the following century. During the battle, Nelson was shot through the spine by a French marksman, and died three hours later while the battle continued. Though a victory, Trafalgar had little effect on the war as a whole. Napoleon wouldn’t hear of the battle for weeks, and less than two months later he would win his greatest victory at the Battle of Austerlitz.
Picture- The Battle of Trafalgar, as Seen from the Mizen Starboard Shrouds of the Victory, J. M. W. Turner, 1806

historiandaily:

"We have lost more than we have gained." -King George III of Great Britain, upon hearing of Horatio Nelson’s death.

October 21, 1805- In the most decisive naval battle of the Napoleonic Wars, a combined fleet of 41 French and Spanish ships are defeated by 33 British ships under Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar. The battle crippled French maritime power for the remainder of the war and ensured Britain would be the sole naval power in the following century. During the battle, Nelson was shot through the spine by a French marksman, and died three hours later while the battle continued. Though a victory, Trafalgar had little effect on the war as a whole. Napoleon wouldn’t hear of the battle for weeks, and less than two months later he would win his greatest victory at the Battle of Austerlitz.

Picture- The Battle of Trafalgar, as Seen from the Mizen Starboard Shrouds of the Victory, J. M. W. Turner, 1806

elorablue:

Autumn: Bratte Bakka

elorablue:

Autumn: Bratte Bakka

Climb the mountain so you can see the world, not so the world can see you.
warhistoryonline:

New on War History Online: Medical Records Reveal Common WWI Ailments http://wrhstol.com/1waTRQ6

warhistoryonline:

New on War History Online: Medical Records Reveal Common WWI Ailments http://wrhstol.com/1waTRQ6